Making our mark

Located at the heart of University Circle, Cleveland's renowned health care and cultural district, Case Western Reserve University's Frances Payne Bolton School of Nursing (FPB) is a globally recognized leader in nursing education. This site presents a variety of news stories, events, publications, and announcements related to our school.

FPB News and Events
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Stories by Year and Month

Contact fpbmarketing@case.edu for more information about any of these stories.

2014:
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July 2014

  • Support Team Aiding Caregivers of Cancer Patients Shows Success . Researchers from the Frances Payne Bolton School of Nursing devised and tested an intervention that quickly integrates a cancer support team to guide caregivers and their patients through difficult end-of-life treatment and decisions. In the study, funded by the National Institute of Nursing Research and the National Cancer Institute, caregivers reported a high degree of satisfaction from having a team comprised of an advance practice nurse, social worker, a spiritual advisor and the patient's oncologist explain what was happening and why during the dying process. The intervention's support team got involved in end-of-life conversations with the patient and caregiver at the first diagnosis of a late-stage cancer. "We owe it to the patients and caregivers to start earlier and think the choices through," said Sara Douglas, PhD, RN, associate professor at the School of Nursing and lead author. She conducted the research with colleague and principal investigator, Barbara Daly, PhD, RN, FAAN, professor of nursing. Read more in The Plain Dealer and Science Daily
  • Raising Grandchildren: When you’re a grandparent, childrearing brings extra challenges . Carol Musil, PhD, RN, FAAN, FGSA, The Marvin E. and Ruth Durr Denekas Professor of Nursing at Case Western Reserve University’s Frances Payne Bolton School of Nursing, was recently featured in U Magazine for her study on grandmothers as primary caregivers to their grandchildren. She says grandmothers who are the primary caregivers are at higher risk for depression and stress than other grandmothers are. Read more about resourcefulness training, including tips in U Magazine

June 2014

May 2014

  • My Bugaboo: Lyme Disease -- Can you hit the bullseye?Lyme Disease chart . Irena L. Kenneley, PhD, RN, APRN-BC, CIC, associate professor in the School of Nursing and an infectious disease expert, sent out an alert about Lyme disease in her latest “My Bugaboo” column in the Association for Professionals in Infection Control (APIC) journal Prevention Strategist. She reminds the public to be particularly cautious between May and July and in the woods or backyards where wild animals like deer and field mice have been. These animals may be giving Lyme disease-infected ticks a ride from one place to another, spreading the disease. These animals can also include the family pets that might bring the ticks indoors. Read more in the Hudson Hub Times and read Dr. Kenneley's column here
  • Crain's Health Care Heroes . Dr. May Wykle was this year's Crain's Lifetime Achievement Award recipient. Read more about Wykle. View the event photo gallery. Learn more about this year's award-winners
  • Slogans sexualize breast cancer, marginalize survivors' pain. Mariah Wilson, a junior nursing student at the Frances Payne Bolton School of Nursing at Case Western Reserve University, wrote a guest column for The Plain Dealer, describing her feelings about breast cancer fundraising techniques and slogans. "I saw T-shirts that said "Stop the war on MyRaq" and "Save second base"," wrote Wilson, whose mother has undergone treatment for breast cancer. "The worst I saw was a campaign on YouTube where women paid men to grope them in the name of research. I was disgusted. Not only have these efforts sexualized breast cancer, they have also alienated survivors and the families they claim to support."Read more in the The Plain Dealer.
  • Local High School Students Learn About Careers in Gerontology. Students from the Upward Bound Math and Science Bridge Program visited the Frances Payne Bolton School of Nursing May 15 to learn more about careers in gerontology and the University Center on Aging and Health, directed by Diana Morris, PhD, RN, FAAN, FGSA. Bridges, coordinated through Cuyahoga Community College and led by Steven Lake and staff, is a collaborative program that connects high achieving high school students in the Cleveland Metropolitan School district with academic exposure and experiences at local universities. Latisha James, senior director of local government & community relations, helps facilitate the events at Case Western Reserve University. Nursing faculty participants included: Christopher Burant, PhD, MACTM, Colin Drummond, PhD, MBA, Evelyn Duffy, DNP, AGPCNP-BC, FAANP, Gregory Graham, PhD(c), and Camille Warner, PhD.
  • CWRU Researchers Profile Women's Employment, Caregiving Workloads, Efforts and Health. A study from Frances Payne Bolton School of Nursing provides a profile of women with the dual responsibilities of full-time paid work and unpaid care for an elderly family member. “We often hear caregivers talk about ‘how much time and effort it takes’ to provide care for their family members or neighbors,” said Evanne Juratovac, PhD, RN (GCNS-BC), assistant professor of nursing and the study’s lead researcher, “so we examined the experience of doing the workload on these women caregivers as the ‘workers.” She said the study is similar to how industry measures the impact of workload (including the time and difficulty of the tasks) and effort (the perceived energy it takes to do the work). Read more in the Hudson Hub Times
  • Addressing childhood obesity where children live, learn, and play. NHLBI-funded studies are using a variety of tactics to address the childhood obesity epidemic. The IMPACT (Ideas Moving Parents and Adolescents to Change Together) trial is a collaborative effort between multiple research and policy centers at Case Western Research University. The multi-level behavioral trial works collaboratively with community partners – parents, students, teachers, The Greater Cleveland YMCA, and the Cleveland Metropolitan School District – to implement the interventions. “Childhood obesity is a complex problem that requires complex solutions,” said Shirley Moore, R.N., Ph.D., FAAN, co-principal investigator for the IMPACT trial and professor of nursing and associate dean for research at the Case Western Reserve University School of Nursing in Cleveland. “We have learned that change is interdependent on the people you live with and your environment. In the IMPACT trial we aim to change families’ patterns.” Read more on the NIH National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute.

April 2014

  • Informal hospice caregiver pain management concerns . A significant portion of hospice care given at home is provided by unpaid and un-professional family caregivers. These caregivers typically experience some mixture and degree of emotional, social and psychological burden due to the demands put upon them to provide quality care. Research has previously identified that the most difficult area for the home giver to oversee is end-of-life pain management. Marjorie Kelley, PhD student, has been featured for an article in Palliative Medicine on a caregiver study. The primary purpose of the study was to, “describe and organize caregiver pain management challenges faced by home hospice caregivers of cancer patients” (Kelley, Demiris, Nguyen, Oliver, Wittenberg-Lyles). Read more.
  • Does counting sheep actually help you fall asleep? It's probably the oldest sleep advice in the books (right up there with sipping on a warm glass of milk), but it turns out counting sheep in your mind's eye probably won't lull you into the Land of Nod on a restless night. "The idea that it puts us to sleep is one of those old wives' tales," says Michael Decker, PhD, a sleep specialist and associate professor at Frances Payne Bolton School of Nursing. Anecdotally, one theory is that the idea originated when early sheep herders couldn't get to sleep at night because they were worried about all of the sheep in their field, according to Decker. So they'd soothe themselves by counting the herd up to make sure they were all safe.Read more.
  • Julie Mooney Named to Jump25.com 2014 All-Star Classic. Jump25.com has released the rosters for the 2014 All-Star Classic, which will be played on Sunday, April 13 inside the Rike Center on the campus of Otterbein University. Amongst those named to the roster was Case Western Reserve University senior guard Julie Mooney, who concluded her Spartan career with All-University Athletic Association honors this winter. In the classroom, Julie is a three-time UAA All-Academic honoree as a nursing major.Read more.

March 2014

  • LRP Success Stories: Imagine All that You Can Achieve in a Research Career. The NIH Loan Repayment Programs has had a major impact on the careers of thousands of research scientists. Ronald Hickman, PhD, RN, ACNP-BC, assistant professor, was highlighted along with other current and former LRP recipients. Read more.
  • NW Ohio to play key role in chemical reform. The most recent federal laws governing toxic chemicals, contained in the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA), were put in place in 1976. No large-scale revisions have been made since. Proposed updates to decades-old federal legislation on chemicals in American-made consumer products are catching heat from Ohio's leading environmental advocacy group. Laura Distelhorst, MSN, RN, instructor, was quoted in the Crescent-News, as well as letters to the editor in the Ironton Tribune, and in the Salem News for her work on environmental health issues and with the Safer Chemicals, Healthy Families (SCHF) campaign. Possible connections between commonly-used chemicals and health problems like infertility and cancer have turned the public's attention to the TSCA. Some large retailers have taken it upon themselves to remove certain chemicals from their shelves in response to consumer demand for products deemed safe.
  • Video conferencing allows near and far caregivers to help loved ones. Of an estimated 65 million Americans who provide some type of care to an ill family member, about 7 million live at least an hour from the relative they’re caring for. The issue, then, is how to get these “distance caregivers” in the room when doctors meet with their patients and local, hands-on caregivers for exams and to discuss treatment. To combat this problem, Sara L. Douglas, PhD, RN, associate professor, Frances Payne Bolton School of Nursing, Case Western Reserve University, recently directed a small pilot project that allowed long-distance relatives to be part of that conversation through real-time videoconferencing. Read more in The Daily.
  • 10 Best Practices for Addressing Ethical Issues and Moral Distress . Ethical conflicts are pervasive in today’s healthcare settings, where organizations are trying to do more with less and medical advances and life-extending treatments often cause suffering. When unable to do what they consider the correct action, clinicians--nurses and other healthcare providers--may experience moral distress. “The nurse manager sets the tone, makes sure the nurses know the resources and provides the resources herself if the institution doesn’t have them,…and creates an environment that allows nurses to practice ethically,” said Barbara J. Daly, PhD, RN, FAAN, a professor at the Frances Payne Bolton School of Nursing, and director of clinical ethics at University Hospitals Case Medical Center in Cleveland, Ohio.Read more in AMN Healthcare News

February 2014

  • Flight NursingResearchers developing technology to link patient records between hospitals, medical flight crews . Although trauma, heart and stroke patients benefit from being transferred from a local hospital to a higher-level care facility, it’s unclear why patients transferred with non-urgent medical conditions show at least a 30 percent higher death rate than had they stayed put, according to researchers from Case Western Reserve University’s Frances Payne Bolton School of Nursing. “We think the answer is somewhere in the medical records,” said Andrew Reimer, KL2 Scholar instructor at the Dorothy Ebersbach Academic Center for Flight Nursing at the nursing school. Reimer, working with Elizabeth Madigan, PhD, RN, FAAN, professor of nursing and associate dean for academic affairs as well as Case Western Reserve engineering and biostatistics experts, is developing technology that overcomes the communication problems and mines information from patient charts.Read more in The Daily.
  • CaregiversMoms of children on life-sustaining devices embrace tips for managing over-stressed lives . Many mothers with children on life-sustaining medical devices, such as ventilators and breathing or feeding tubes, suffer physical and psychological distress from the stress of juggling treatments, appointments, therapies and daily family pressures. But researchers from Frances Payne Bolton School of Nursing found that an intervention, called “Resourcefulness,” which teaches moms how to better cope, bolsters the mother’s wellbeing and, in turn, benefits the whole family. Valerie Boebel Toly, PhD, RN, CPNP Assistant Professor at Frances Payne Bolton School of Nursing, directed the study with nursing school professors Carol Musil, PhD, RN, FAAN The Marvin E. and Ruth Durr Denekas Professor of Nursing, and Jaclene Zauszniewski, PhD, RN-BC, FAAN Kate Hanna Harvey Professor in Community Health Nursing. Read more on Health Canal.
  • Savrin, Iannadrea Discuss CHOMP on Fox 8 . Note: Interview begins at minute 43:00. Carol Savrin, who directs CHOMP and the Frances Payne Bolton School of Nursing’s MSN Graduate Program, and Jean Iannadrea, instructor in the School of Dental Medicine discuss a three-year pilot program called Collaborative Home for Oral Health, Medical Review and Health Promotion—or CHOMP. The program allows patients at Case Western Reserve's dental clinic to receive simultaneous dental and medical attention. Watch the interview at minute 43:00 on Fox 8.
  • Can’t find nurses for your program? These surgery programs grow their own. With aging nurses, the nursing shortage can only get worse. In terms of surgical nurses, the problem is made worse by the fact that most nursing programs don’t include a perioperative curriculum. About 50 persons have expressed interest in the mandated periop course that is part of the BSN curriculum at Frances Paynce Bolton School of Nursing, says Rebecca M. Patton, MSN, RN, CNOR, FAAN, Lucy Jo Atkinson scholar in perioperative nursing. The program is one of the few mandated in the country. Students are encouraged to scrub in. Read more in Same-Day Surgery.

January 2014

  • How to Kick Your Snooze Button Habit Those first few moments of the morning -- when we're likely to be hitting snooze -- are pretty crucial in how the rest of your day goes. "In the early-morning hours, our brain starts preparing our body to wake up before we actually are conscious," says Michael Decker, PhD, RN, RRT, Diplomate ABSM, a sleep specialist and associate professor at the School of Nursing. "The way we wake up really sets our tone for the day," he says. Luckily for chronic snoozers, our internal alarm clocks are highly trainable, says Decker. Read more on The Huffington Post.
  • The Benefits of a Distance Caregiver Sara L. Douglas, PhD, RN, associate professor, Frances Payne Bolton School of Nursing, Case Western Reserve University, discusses the results of a pilot study that examined the benefit of having a distance caregiver (a relative) present via live video while the cancer patient met with doctors. Douglas says the study showed a statistically significant and clinically significant reduction of anxiety for the distance caregivers before the meeting versus after the meeting. Watch more on Oncology Nursing News.
  • Studies: Younger HIV patients more isolated, stressed than older patients; life expectancy improving Even as more advanced antiretroviral therapies are improving the length and quality of life of people with HIV, those on the younger end of the age spectrum are dealing with more stress and isolation than their older counterparts, according to findings by researchers at Case Western Reserve University that were published in the journal AIDS Care. “If we could find a sponsor, I would love to do this for five to 10 years,” said lead author Allison Webel, assistant professor at CWRU’s Frances Payne Bolton School of Nursing. Citing a diverse demographic that includes black and heterosexual female patients, and fewer substance abusers, Webel said, “I think we have a really great population to study here.” Read more in The Plain Dealer.

December 2013

  • "CHOMP" pilot program offers one-stop oral and health care at CWRU clinic Patients at Case Western Reserve's dental clinic can now receive simultaneous dental and medical attention as part of a three-year pilot program called Collaborative Home for Oral Health, Medical Review and Health Promotion—or CHOMP, as it’s called. The program hopes to discover what benefits patients and students receive when two professions work together. Carol Savrin, who directs CHOMP and the Frances Payne Bolton School of Nursing’s MSN Graduate Program, and Kristin Victoroff, associate dean at the Case Western Reserve University School of Dental Medicine, launched the program in February with student dentist-nurse teams working in the admitting and pediatric clinics two full days a week. Faculty and students from each school trained to learn more about each other’s profession before the program began. Read more in The Daily.
  • FPB Alumni Act as Patients in Teaching Program. One of the biggest challenges nurses face in their everyday jobs is the constant patient interaction, which Alfes says many nursing students find intimidating, says Celeste Alfes, an assistant professor and the director of the Learning Resource Center at the Frances Payne Bolton School of Nursing. To combat this, Alfes, along with the dean of the school, Mary Kerr, and the professors of the psychiatric mental health course at the nursing school, have recently developed and implemented a standardized patient simulation program so that undergraduates may improve upon their communication skills. Alumni volunteers of the nursing school are being trained to play these roles in order to provide real-life scenarios for nursing students to address. Read more in The Observer.
  • Damato Receives NANN Distinguished Service AwardThe National Association of Neonatal Nurses announced their 2013 award winners. Elizabeth Damato, PhD, RN, associate professor in the school of nursing, received the Distinguished Service Award. The award recognizes outstanding and dedicated service to NANN by honoring an individual who has advanced the mission of the association in a significant and lasting way. In the words of her nominator, “Lisa is a remarkable NANN member who has donated innumerable hours of service to the association.” Read the announcement.

November 2013

  • Stress and isolation take toll on those under 50 with HIV; older people fare better. Case Western Reserve University researchers were surprised to learn that people younger than 50 years old with HIV feel more isolated and stressed than older people with the disease. They expected their study to reveal just the opposite. “The younger, newly diagnosed individual may not know anyone in their peer group with a chronic illness, much less HIV,” said Allison Webel, PhD, RN, assistant professor at Case Western Reserve’s Frances Payne Bolton School of Nursing. Read more on Health Canal.
  • 5 questions with Arielle Dolezal. Arielle Dolezal will share her passion for dance at the semiannual Mather Dance Collective (MaDaCol) performance. Dolezal, a senior nursing major and dance minor, is co-president of MaDaCol, the undergraduate dance ensemble, which will hold its 30th anniversary performance Nov. 21-23 in Mather Dance Center. Read more in The Daily.
  • The Stages of Nursing. Sophomore nursing student Alexis Attinoto shares how she connects with a new audience in the Case Footlighters production of Merrily We Roll Along. Read more.
  • How Having a Conversation With Kids About Weight Talking to kids about their health, and not the way they look, tends to get better responses. Parents should also be taking their own habits into account when talking to their kids about weight issues. “Role modeling an active lifestyle and maintaining healthy food choices at home is important,” says Elizabeth Click, RN, an assistant professor at the Frances Payne Bolton School of Nursing. Read more on Everyday Health.

October 2013

  • How Technology is Helping Nurses Build Patient Engagement. Engaging patients in their own health care and helping them work in tandem with the care team has become one of the key themes in modern medical practice. Ronald Hickman, associate professor at Frances Payne Bolton School of Nursing, and his colleagues created an avatar-based simulation system that has helped people better manage their high blood pressure and symptoms of depression. He's now developing a software application that caregivers can use to help them become proactive in making health care decisions for loved ones who are unable to make those decisions. Read more from Nurse Zone.
  • 8 Habits Of Extremely Well-Rested People. Many of the most well-rested have some simple habits that help them achieve plenty of high-quality rest. Michael Decker, a sleep specialist and associate professor at Frances Payne Bolton School of Nursing shares some of the most common traits of the well-rested. Read more from The Huffington Post.
  • What A Constantly Plugged-In Life Is Doing To Kids' Bodies. The amount of time kids spend on screens can have a big impact on their health. Teens' sleep can be disrupted by screens because the bright lights that glow from the devices "wakes up the brain," Michael Decker, a sleep specialist and associate professor at Frances Payne Bolton School of Nursing. Not getting enough sleep has a psychological effect on teens, and can lead to irritability and poor social skills. Read more from The Huffington Post.
  • FPB Alumni Help a Dying Dad to His Daughter's Wedding. University Hospital's nurse practitioners and Frances Payne Bolton School of Nursing MSN graduates Julie Ray (NUR'11) and Jacky Uljanic (NUR'11) were part of the medical team that volunteered to help patient Scott Nagy, a terminal cancer patient, go to his daughter Sarah's wedding in Strongsville. Read more from The Plain Dealer.
  • Celebrate National Midwifery Week. Certified Nurse Midwives assist in the births of 10,000 Ohio babies each year. Help us celebrate 10,000 birthdays with free cupcakes at 11am Oct. 10, at Euclid & Adelbert. Cupcakes will be given to the first 1,000 people.

September 2013

August 2013

  • Not Filling Vacancies Poses Risks for Healthcare Employers. Even though many healthcare systems continue to hire, the time it takes to fill key nursing and other clinical positions can negatively affect the organization and patient care, according to a recent nationwide survey conducted for CareerBuilder. Rebecca Patton, MSN, RN, CNOR, FAAN, Instructor and Lucy Jo Atkinson Scholar in Perioperative Nursing, spoke about the process and issues involved. Read more from AMN Healthcare.
  • Women Who Care for Grandchildren are at Risk for Depression. The study by Carol Musil, PhD, RN, FAAN, Professor of Nursing, included 240 Ohio grandmothers whose average age was 57. The women were followed for more than 6 years to see how caring for grandchildren aged 16 and younger affected their health. Read more from U.S. News and World Report.
  • Wykle Receives Lifetime Achievement Award. May Wykle, PhD, RN, FAAN, FGSA, Professor Emerita of Nursing, will be honored by Sigma Theta Tau International Honor Society of Nursing with its 2013 Nell J. Watts Lifetime Achievement in Nursing Award at its biennial convention in November.
  • Patton Receives Sigma Theta Tau Award. Sigma Theta Tau International Honor Society of Nursing will honor Rebecca Patton, MSN, RN, CNOR, FAAN, Instructor and Lucy Jo Atkinson Scholar in Perioperative Nursing, with its 2013 Recipient of the Dorothy Garrigus Adams Award for Excellence in Fostering Professional Standards at its biennial convention in November.
  • FPB Alumna and University Hospitals Nurse Helps Save Boy's Life at Lake Erie Beach. Kathy Halloway, BSN'07, dove into Lake Erie Saturday, August 24, after seeing a 4-year-old boy floating face down and the boy's mother screaming for help. Halloway and other bystanders were able to get the boy out of the water and perform CPR on him.
  • FPB Receives Nurse Faculty Loan Program Grant. Jaclene Zauszniewski, PhD, RN-BC, FAAN, The Kate Hanna Harvey Professor of Community Health Nursing and Director, PhD Program, received $2.5 million from the Health Resources and Service Administration (HRSA) for the Nurse Faculty Loan Program. News of this grant was recently featured in Crain’s Cleveland Business.
  • Hickman Receives Grant for Avatar Technology. Ronald L. Hickman, Jr., assistant professor of nursing, and a Case Western Reserve University team was awarded $475,476 for an R15 research grant from the National Institute of Nursing Research, National Institutes of Health for his project, “Avatar-Based Decision Support Technology for Surrogate Decision Makers.” Read more

June 2013

  • FPB Research Featured in WVIZ Documentary. Shirley Moore, the Edward J. and Louise Mellen Professor of Nursing, was featured on a WVIZ/PBS special to discuss the IMPACT study and other research taking place in our region to combat childhood obesity. The show originally aired June 27 and will re-air on WVIZ/PBS June 30 at 2 p.m. and 11 p.m. and July 1 at 10 p.m. View “Chapter 4: Changing Habits & Environments” at the WVIZ website. Read more.
  • New $1.76 million grant for Palliative Care Fellowships. The Frances Payne Bolton School of Nursing has received a five-year, $1.76 million grant from the National Institute of Nursing Research to support eight pre- and postdoctoral fellows in palliative care. The nursing school, the only one nationally that offers a master’s program specifically combining oncology and palliative care, has begun recruiting students. For information on applying for one of these fellowships, please email Barbara Daly PhD, RN, FAAN, at bjd4@case.edu orcall 216-368-5994. Read more.
  • FPB and OAAPN Join Forces for Online CE Course. The Frances Payne Bolton School of Nursing with the Ohio Association of Advanced Practice Nurses is offering an online continuing education webinar on Schedule II Prescriptions. This six hour, six CE-credit course meets Ohio’s Certificate to Prescribe requirements for the August 31 licensure deadline. The course costs $50 for member and $75 for nonmembers. Read more.

May 2013

April 2013

  • Affirmation Model May Help in Weight Management: Edward J. and Louise Mellen Professor of Nursing and Associate Dean for Research Shirley M. Moore, PhD, RN, FAAN used the "appreciative inquiry" affirmation model to investigate how families take part in their adolescents' weight-management efforts. Dr. Moore reported the findings from focus groups of 44 parents or guardians at the annual meeting of the Society of Behavioral Medicine. Read more.
  • New Study Finds Mothers with Postpartum Depression Would Welcome Online Professional Treatment: Mothers suffering from postpartum depression after a high-risk pregnancy would turn to online interventions if available anonymously and from professional healthcare providers, according to researchers from Case Western Reserve University’s Frances Payne Bolton School of Nursing and College of Arts and Sciences. Read more.

March 2013

February 2013

January 2013

  • Project Aims to Improve Nurse-Physician Collaboration for Patient Safety and Healthcare: Assistant Professor and Director of the Graduate Entry Nursing Program Deborah Lindell, DNP, PHCNS-BC, CNE co-directed a campus-wide initiative to train nursing and medical students to work more collaboratively in order to improve patient safety and care. The initiative involved a total of six institutions including Case Western Reserve University and was funded by the Josiah Macy Jr. Foundation. Read more.
  • Privacy an Issue for Mothers with Newborns in Neonatal Intensive Care: Associate Professor Donna Dowling, PhD, RN has published a new study, "Mothers' Experiences Expressing Breast Milk for Their Preterm Infants," which claims that many mothers in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) miss feedings for their newborn babies due to timidity and interruptions from lack of privacy in these settings. Read more.
  • Introducing Forefront, FPB's New Magazine on Nursing Innovation and Leadership: Created for alumni and friends, this new magazine informs readers about FPB's excellence in nursing science, education and practice and how it impacts daily lives. For its inaugural Fall/Winter 2012 issue, the powerful cover story examines a growing health care crisis--the effects of post-traumatic stress on military personnel and their families--and how FPB's Family Systems Psychiatric Mental Health Nursing program is answering their calls for help. Get a sneak peek of the online edition.

November 2012

October 2012

September 2012

August 2012

July 2012

  • 14 worst hospital mistakes to avoid: To help prevent harm at the hospital, there is plenty patients can do, according to Prevention. For example, says Caitlin Brennan, a postdoctoral fellow in the Frances Payne Bolton School of Nursing, when there is a shift change, be sure to meet with your new nurse to ask any questions. Read more.

June 2012

May 2012

  • Man with Diabetes Determined to Help Others with the Disease Live Well: Tom Tobin, a Cleveland Heights resident, lost his vision at age 21 due to complications from diabetes; since then, he’s devoted himself to raising money for education programs focused on prevention. He and FPB nursing research associate Ann Williams, PhD, RN, CDE organized a Swim for Diabetes team called the VIPs—Visually Impaired Persons. Read more.
  • FPB Collaborates with AACN to Expand Access to Doctoral Education: FPB's partnership with the American Association of Critical-Care Nurses (AACN), the world’s largest specialty nursing organization, will give AACN's more than 80,000 members eligibility for partial scholarships from FPB to explore becoming clinical leaders or researchers with an intensive FPB health policy course. Read more.

April 2012

March 2012

February 2012

January 2012

December 2011

November 2011

October 2011

September 2011

  • FPB Doctoral Student Examines Over-the-Counter Drug's Impact on Chemotherapy Side Effects: Nurse practitioner and PhD candidate Beth Faiman is studying whether an over-the-counter medication known as Glutamine could ease chemotherapy side effects for people with blood and bone marrow cancers. She is one of few researchers studying the drug's effectiveness. Read more.
  • DNP Thesis Finds Parents of 9/11 Victims Suffer Too: DNP student Fran McGibbon's doctoral thesis examined parents of firefighters who died in the terrorist attack on the World Trade Center ten years ago. "The parents always struck me as an example of people that experienced such terrible tragedy but were forgotten about in the aftermath," she says. Read more.
  • Opportunities for Nurses Are Broad and Numerous: In 201 Careers in Nursing, co-author Joyce Fitzpatrick reveals that these days nurses do much more than monitor blood pressure and take a patient's temperature. They travel the high seas, work as crime scene investigators, and serve as expert witnesses. Read more.
  • Change Your Environment to Self-Manage Diabetes: Associate Dean for Research and Mellen Professor of Nursing Shirley Moore spoke at the American Association of Diabetes Educators conference last month on a new trend in self-management programs for diabetes: SystemCHANGE. She developed it as an ecological theory that considers four main influences of environment on behavior: family, physical, social, and community. Read more.

August 2011

July 2011

  • FPB Prepares Future Nurses for the OR Environment: Beginning this fall, FPB will introduce mandatory perioperative nursing content to its undergraduate curriculum, becoming one of the first nursing schools in the country to do so. Atkinson Scholar of Perioperative Nursing Rebecca Patton and BSN Program Director and Associate Dean of the Undergraduate Program Marilyn Lotas are overseeing this innovative new program. Read more.
  • A Quick Nap Is Good for You: Assistant Professor Elizabeth Click writes this week's special NetWellness column for The Plain Dealer, in which she demonstrates how research suggests that taking naps throughout the day can be one way of recovering a bit of the sleep debt that many people live with on a daily basis. Read more.
  • More Grandparents Taking on a Second Round of Parenting: More grandparents than ever are taking on the responsibilities of parenting their grandchildren, when the grandchild’s parents are out of the picture. This new role is causing extra worry, says Professor Carol Musil in USA Today. “It’s this magnified multi-generational parenting. They’re worrying about two generations of kids,” she explains. Read the full article.
  • Five Questions with Dean Mary Kerr: After 20 years, Mary Kerr has returned to her alma mater as FPB's new dean and the inaugural holder of the May L.Wykle Endowed Professorship in Nursing. She comes to Case Western Reserve University after serving as the deputy director of the National Institute of Nursing Research at the National Institutes of Health. Get to know more about her.
  • Communicating the Importance of Environmental Hygiene to Healthcare Workers: Assistant Professor Irena Kenneley's comments on contaminated environmental surfaces in healthcare facilities are featured in Infection Control Today, in which she discusses the impact of such contamination on patients and recommends continuous training to environmental services and housekeeping personnel. Read more.
  • June Watt, Emeritus Professor at FPB, Passes Away: On the evening of July 4, FPB Associate Emeritus Professor of Psychiatric-Mental Health Nursing June I. Watt passed away at the age of 93. She was an invaluable mentor to Dean May Wykle and many other proud nursing alumni. Read more.
  • Dean May Wykle To Be Inducted into International Hall of Fame for Nurse Researchers: Before stepping down as dean later this month, Dean Wykle will join a distinguished group of peers in July to be inducted into the Sigma Theta Tau International Nurse Researcher Hall of Fame.  She is among 15 exemplars from the field of nursing to receive the honor during the Sigma Theta Tau International’s 22nd International Nurse Research Congress, July 14, in Cancun, Mexico. Read more.

June 2011

  • Shift Workers Struggle with Getting Sleep: Assistant Professor Elizabeth Click comments in The Plain Dealer about the detrimental effects of disrupted and inadequate sleep on the millions of Americans--including nurses and other health care professionals--who regularly work outside the typical daily schedule. Read more.
  • Melissa Pinto-Foltz Studies Ways to Help Teens Overcome Fears and Stigmas of Mental Illness: A KL2 Clinical Research Scholar and instructor at FPB, Dr. Melissa Pinto-Foltz wants to find the magical elixir that helps teens speak up, seek help, and then stick with treatments that get them feeling better. Read more.
  • Linda Burnes Bolton Delivers the 2011 Schlotfeldt Lecture: Dr. Bolton, a CWRU trustee, presented on the landmark Institute of Medicine's 2010 report in her lecture entitled "The Future of Nursing: Human Caring for All" on June 4. As Vice President and Chief Nursing Officer at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, she was recently named One of the Top 25 Women in Healthcare by Modern Healthcare Magazine and was also given an Honorary Alumna Award by the FPB Alumni Association and Dean May Wykle at the end of the discussion. Watch a video of her presentation.
  • FPB Names Mary E. Kerr as New Dean: President Barbara R. Snyder announced today that Mary E. Kerr will become the new dean of the Frances Payne Bolton School of Nursing, effective July 18. She comes to Case Western Reserve after five and a half years as Deputy Director of the National Institute of Nursing Research at the National Institutes of Health. Read more.

May 2011

  • First Class of MN Students Graduates from FPB: Representing a new milestone for FPB's Graduate Entry program, 32 students received their Master of Nursing (MN) degrees on May 15. They are the first class to study and complete FPB's revised and enhanced pre-licensure curriculum, which was developed under the direction of Dr. Deborah Lindell over the past two years. Read more.
  • Combating the C. diff Microbial Terrorists on the Loose in Hospitals: Irena L. Kenneley calls for a need for mandatory standards for hand-washing monitoring and antimicrobial stewardship committees to oversee use of broad-spectrum antibiotics that wipe out the good bacteria along with the bad, as well as new technologies that can detect the presence of the bacteria after rooms have been thoroughly cleaned. Read more.
  • FPB's Ann S. Williams and Shirley M. Moore Call for Changing How Research Is Done: Despite the passage of the American Disabilities Act 20 years ago, people with limiting physical issues are still being barred from research studies. Via the National Institutes of Nursing Research/National Institute of Health funded Full INclusion of persons with Disabilities in self-management (FIND) Lab, FPB researchers Ann S. Williams and Shirley M. Moore want to change that restriction. Read more.

April 2011

March 2011

  • Parents of Twins Slightly More Likely to Divorce: Associate Professor Elizabeth G. Damato comments on a Boston study analyzing divorce rates among parents of twins. She adds that these parents' stress and lack of sleep may be worse than in parents with one baby, thus serving as a potential contributing factor to the higher divorce rates. Source: Reuters. Read more.
  • Conference Highlights Technologies to Keep Seniors Living Independently: The 19th Florence Cellar Conference, “Aging 2.0:  Technology, Trends and Transitions," will be held on April 8, 2011 and is one of the first conferences in northeast Ohio that brings together researchers and technology developers interested in assisting older adults. Speakers will address the landscape of health care technology targeted at older adults, emerging and future trends in technology, and related policy and ethical issues. Read more.
  • Remembering Frances Payne Bolton for Women's History Month: The Plain Dealer honors Frances Payne Bolton, the first woman elected to Congress from Ohio and the creator of the U.S. Cadet Nursing Corps, who made her mark in politics, nursing education, and philanthropy. Read more.
  • Discover Mental Health: The Forgotten Piece in Elder Care: Dean May L. Wykle is prominently featured in a special video produced by the American Academy of Nursing's geropsychiatric collaboration with the John A. Hartford Foundation, in which she discusses her legacy of research in gerontology and psychiatric/mental health. Watch the video.
  • FPB Boosts Rankings for Graduate Programs: U.S. News and World Reports released its annual rankings for graduate-level health care education programs in March 2011, and there was good news for the Frances Payne Bolton School of Nursing. While the school itself remains at #15 across the country for its overall graduate programs, the nurse anesthesia programs rose to #7 and #11, while nurse midwifery went up to #17. Read more.
  • Taiwanese Nursing Students Visit FPB for Nursing Skills and Educational Training Program: Continuing FPB's tradition of hosting international students for extensive training programs, Taiwan's Chang Gung Institute of Technology Department of Nursing sent eight undergraduate nursing students and a faculty member to FPB to engage in an intensive month-long training program incorporating a wide variety of nursing-related educational and clinical activities. Read more.

February 2011

January 2011

December 2010

  • FPB Celebrates Home for the Holidays: Home for the Holidays is the event sponsored by FPB's International Health Programs office celebrating every country represented by our many international students. Students cook traditional dishes, so everyone has the opportunity to taste various kinds of delicious food from all over the world. This year's event was held on Friday, December 17. Take a look at some photo highlights.
  • BSN Capstone Students Present Posters at Intersections 2010: The Intersections: SOURCE Undergraduate Symposium and Poster Session was held on December 3, 2010 in Adelbert Gym. The event was sponsored by SOURCE, SAGES, and the Frances Payne Bolton School of Nursing. View a photo slideshow.
  • Stimulus Money to Establish Campus Behavior Science Resource Lab: FPB's Associate Dean for Research Shirley M. Moore, in collaboration with the School of Medicine, received a one-year, $647,000 grant from National Institutes of Health, funded by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009, to establish a new lab that will merge the FIND Lab (Full Inclusion of Persons with Disabilities in Research), the Survey Development Lab, and the Behavioral Measurement Core Facility. Read more.

November 2010

October 2010

September 2010

  • E-SMART Technologies May Help Young Adults Manage Mental Illness: Melissa Pinto-Foltz, a postdoctoral scholar and instructor, joined an FPB-based research team that is developing and testing a software program called Electronic Self-Management Resource Training to Reduce Health Disparities (e-SMART-HD). Her goal is to improve the access to mental health services and mental health self-management for adolescents and young adults. Read more.
  • Nursing Beyond Borders: FPB's nursing program doesn't just take place in classrooms and hospital settings. Rather, our students travel throughout the local community, the United States, and the globe to work hands-on with a variety of populations as part of their Senior Capstone. Select members of this year's senior class are blogging from Cameroon, China, our newest capstone site in Alaska, and other locations to share how they are putting to use in remote, real-world settings what they've learned in class and during their clinical hours. Read more.
  • Sleep Music - Helping Old Persons Slumber Effectively: Recent studies by researchers in the Buddhist Tzu-Chi Standard Hospital in Taiwan and FPB shows that by listening to delicate sounding music through bedtime, more aged adults can have longer and better get to sleep. Read more.

August 2010

July 2010

  • Dr. Joyce Fitzpatrick's new book, Giving Through Teaching — How Nurse Educators are Changing the World, is featured in the University of Arkansas - Fort Smith website. Read more.
  • Third-Year BSN Student Volunteers Nursing Services to Rural Dominican Republic Villages: Although Eduardo Locci one day plans to take to the skies as a flight nurse and care for trauma patients, this summer he spent two unforgettable weeks as a volunteer nurse/medical assistant for a clinic called A Mother’s Wish in the Dominican Republic town of Los Pajones, which is a 30-minute drive from Santiago. Read more.
  • Making It Stick: Survivors of cardiac events have a hard time sticking with exercise programs after their recovery. Assistant Professor Mary A. Dolansky's research finds that one year after completing a 12-week rehabilitation following a cardiac event-a heart attack, bypass surgery or angioplasty, only 37 percent of her subjects exercised three times a week to keep their hearts healthy. Read more.
  • Two FPB Faculty Inducted into STTI's Nurse Researcher Hall of Fame: Shirley M. Moore, Susan M. Ludington, and two FPB alumni are among 22 nurses honored as leaders, mentors, scholars, and role models by Sigma Theta Tau International in 2010. Their awards, which were conferred at the 21st International Nursing Research Congress in Orlando, Florida, “recognizes nurse researchers who are STTI members who have achieved long term, broad national and/or international recognition for their work and whose research has impacted the profession and the people it serves.” Read more.
  • Comic Book Helps Families in Migrant Camps Eat Healthier, Decrease Obesity: Families who live in migrant camps usually don't have cars, are many miles from a grocery store, and don't have the time or kitchen tools for a lot of food preparation. The "convenient" choices they make -- food high in fat, sugar, and salt -- tend to degrade their health, though they don't always realize it, says Jill Kilanowski, assistant professor of nursing, who designed a colorful new intervention tool to help families make healthier choices. Source: The Plain Dealer. Read more.
  • Making It Stick: FPB researchers checked up on 248 individuals one year after completing a 12-week rehabilitation following a cardiac event-a heart attack, bypass surgery or angioplasty -- and found that only 37 percent exercised three times a week to keep their hearts healthy. "The study points out that interventions are needed to keep people exercising," says Mary Dolansky, assistant professor of nursing and the lead investigator of the study. Read more.
  • Accurate Delivery: Adjunct faculty and researcher Ann Williams demonstrates that visually impaired people with diabetes administer their insulin properly, and in some cases they do so better than their sighted counterparts. Read more.

June 2010

  • Josiah Macy, Jr. Foundation Grant to Enhance Physician and Nursing Education: FPB and the Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine have received a $640,000 grant from the Josiah Macy, Jr. Foundation for the new Interprofessional Learning Exchange and Development (I-LEAD) Program. The project will involve several experience-based components to improve communication and collaboration among nurses and physicians in the interest of public health and to reflect changes in the healthcare system.
  • Most Heart Patients Skimp on Exercise After Rehab: Only about one-third of cardiac patients were doing regular heart-healthy exercises a year after a heart attack, bypass surgery or angioplasty, researchers have found. The research team, led by Mary Dolansky, PhD, RN, followed 248 patients after they completed a 12-week cardio rehabilitation program to help train them to exercise. Exercise patterns in the longitudinal study were tracked through heart monitors worn by the patients. After one year, only 37 percent of the patients were exercising even three times a week, the investigators found. Women were less likely than men to exercise, while younger men were more likely than women or older men to stick with their exercise program, the study authors noted. Source: BusinessWeek.
  • Health Study Seeking People 65+:Two Case Western Reserve University researchers are studying the health of older women to gain an understanding as to why some women of older age with a chronic illness do better than other women with the same illness. The study is funded by the University Center on Aging and Health. Source: Sandusky Register.
  • O'Linn Receives President’s Award for Distinguished Service: Kathleen O'Linn, who joined the university in 1994 and serves as the human resources manager for FPB, is supportive of causes and programs that have a transformational effect on people's lives. This shows in her work with the school’s Food for Thought professional development program and her leadership in the university’s Staff Advisory Council. Read more.
  • Comic Book Moms are Nutrition Heroes to Guide Migrant Family Health: Two Latina mothers are heroes in the new comic book, Small Changes Big Results. Their quest is to create a healthier lifestyle for their children and families and combat obesity, just like real-life moms in Latino farm workers' families who are concerned about the growing obesity problem among young children. Assistant Professor Jill Kilanowski says the goal of the project is to help families make healthy choices. Read more.
  • Dean Wykle to Step Down After a Decade of Leadership: On Monday, June 7, Dr. May L. Wykle, the Marvin E. and Ruth Durr Denekas Professor & Dean of Nursing, announced that she will be stepping down as dean of the Frances Payne Bolton School of Nursing effective January 1, 2011. Read more.
  • Faces of Nursing: Advancing Care: Changes in advanced practice nursing over time are intertwined with the story of how Dean May L. Wykle became a leading nurse educator. Deirdre Murphy, BSN '10, is also featured. Source: Cleveland magazine.
  • Choosing the Right Baby Bottle: Bottle feeding manufacturers offer an array of products that claim to be best for babies. Associate Professor Donna Dowling has been studying bottle and nipple systems and has tips for parents.
  • Nurse Educators Changing the World Highlighted in New Book: The quiet actions of unsung heroes from the rainforest of Guatemala to the city streets of Harlem will be celebrated during the 2010 International Year of the Nurse in Elizabeth Brooks Ford Professor of Nursing Joyce J. Fitzpatrick's new book, Giving through Teaching: How Nurse Educators are Changing the World (Springer Publishing). Read more.
  • Improving Patient-Doc Communications: FPB is leading an interdisciplinary research team in a two-year, $1.3 million National Center on Minority Health and Health Disparities study called "Electronic Self-Management Resource Training to Reduce Health Disparities (e-SMART-HD)." Professor John Clochesy, PhD, RN, FAAN, FCCM, who is director of the study, discusses its goal of effecting long-term improvements in healthcare outcomes for those with chronic illnesses by providing an interactive, culturally relevant, accessible, and easy to use computer-based simulation system. Source: ADVANCE for Nurses. Read more.

May 2010

April 2010

  • Students from University of Hong Kong embark on third annual educational tour at FPB: For three weeks in March and April 2010, ten undergraduate nursing students from the University of Hong Kong School of Nursing visited FPB on an educational mission to learn about the American health care system and nursing. Their visit was coordinated by Associate Dean for the Undergraduate Program and Associate Professor Marilyn Lotas, PhD, RN and Samira Hussney, MPH, director of International Health Programs at FPB. Read more.
  • Making Hospitals Do the Right Thing in the Equitable Treatment of Gay and Lesbian Couples: FPB student services recruiter Peter Taylor is featured in a column by Pulitzer Prize-winner journalist Connie Schultz on President Barack Obama's recent order that mandates that most hospitals respect the rights of same-sex couples. Source: The Plain Dealer. Read more.
  • Five FPB Faculty Honored at 2010 MNRS Conference: FPB faculty illuminated this year's Annual Research Conference of the Midwest Nursing Research Society on April 8-11, 2010 in Kansas City, Missouri with five award wins, including two major honors for professors Joyce Fitzpatrick and Elizabeth Madigan. Other awards went to post-doctoral student Cathy Baker and assistant professors Mary Dolansky and Jill Kilanowski. Read more.
  • FPB Researchers Show Off Medical Possibilities: FPB's SMART Center and FIND Lab made a strong showing at Case Western Reserve University's Research Showcase on April 15, demonstrating how people with disabilities can be encouraged to participate in research studies. Source: MedCity News. Read more.
  • FPB Researchers Work to Keep Cardiac Rehab Patients on Track with Healthier Lifestyles: Assistant Professor Mary Dolansky, PhD, RN is leading a study that has found that only 37 percent of people who complete a cardiac-rehabilitation program after a cardiac event stick with the exercise in the future. Study co-investigator and Associate Dean for Research Shirley Moore, PhD, RN, FAAN also comments. Source: The Plain Dealer. Read more.
  • FPB's Diverse Educational Opportunities Attract Japanese Faculty Visitors: During the second half of March 2010, three junior nursing faculty members from Kagoshima University in Japan visited FPB to take part in nurse training programs and clinical experiences that will help them boost their curriculum offerings at their home institution. Read more.
  • New Study Examines Effectiveness of Telemonitoring Vital Signs: FPB's University Center on Aging and Health awarded a one-year pilot grant to Dr. Elizabeth Madigan and two others to work with 40 patients under the care of the Cleveland Visiting Nurses Association (VNA) of Ohio. They will examine how effective TeleCare, a home monitoring device the size of an alarm clock, is in keeping individuals with complex health issues healthy and out of the hospital. "We hope to find out which patients benefit the most from telehealth monitoring," Madigan says. Read more.
  • FPB's University Center on Aging and Health Funds New Project: Researchers throughout Case Western Reserve University will look for evidence within the brain for human beta defensin peptide function—proteins important to the peripheral body's natural defense system against infection from the outside environment. They will examine brain tissues to explore the possibility that the beta defensins contribute to degenerative brain diseases and in particular Alzheimer's disease (AD). Read more.

March 2010

February 2010

January 2010

December 2009

November 2009

October 2009

September 2009

August 2009

July 2009

June 2009

May 2009

April 2009

March 2009

February 2009

January 2009

  • A life forever changed by a flash of TV fame: The Plain Dealer presents a snapshot of former Survivor contestant and 2000 MSN alum Margaret Bobonich, who has led FPB students on three nursing missions to San Raymundo, Guatemala. (PDF)
  • Nursing instructor Valerie Toly, MSN, RN, CPNP will present her abstract, "Families of Children Who Are Technology Dependent" at the 2009 American Thoracic Society International Conference. The conference takes place on May 15-20 in San Diego, California and serves as one of the largest gatherings of pulmonary and critical care clinicians and researchers in the world.
  • Assistant Professor Evelyn Duffy, DNP, ANP/GNP-BC, FAANP, has been appointed to the Gerontological Advanced Practice Nurses Association's (GAPNA) expert panel on "Transitioning to Adult-Gerontology APRN Education: Ensuring the APRN Workforce Is Prepared to Care for Older Adults." GAPNA is "the organization of choice for advanced practice nurses who want to pursue continuing education in gerontological care and who seek peer support from experienced clinicians."
  • "Audio Instruction for Use of Insulin Pens by Blind People," a research project developed by post-doctoral student Ann Williams, PhD, RN, CDE, receives funding from the American Association of Diabetes Educators (AADE) and Sigma Theta Tau International (STTI). Dr. Williams' recent article, "Diabetes and Visual Impairment: Identifying Needs, Ensuring Full Accessibility," is available online at DiabetesVoice.org.
  • Post-Doctoral student Alberta Bee, PhD, RN, FNP-BC, CPNP receives grant funding from the W. K. Kellogg Foundation. Her research study is titled, "The Stress and Health of African American Women Transitioning from Motherhood to Early Grandmotherhood."
  • Assistant Professor Amy Zhang, MS, PhD receives funding for her research project Improving Urinary Continence and Quality of Life in Prostate Cancer Patients from the National Institutes of Health (NIH), National Cancer Institute.